Men of the 46th Regiment on the Port Hope Town Park hill, 1883
Col. Arthur Trefusis Heneage Williams, seated centre. 


THE 46th BATTALION IN CAMP
from The Port Hope Times, September 4th, 1879 - page 4

The 46th Battalion went into camp in the Park, (Ward's Hill), on Tuesday morning last, and dozens of young able men, eager to join, had to be refused in consequence of the six Companies forming the Battalion having the full quota of men allotted them by the Militia Department. 

The staff consists of— 
Commanding Officer— Col. Williams, M P. 
Majors — C A Boulton and F A Benson. 
Adjutant — Major Garnett. 
Surgeon — Dr Slight. 
Quarter-Master — P T Kellaway. 
Pay-Master — Major Howden. 

The Company Officers are as follows:— 
No. 2 Company — Major Dingwall and Lieutenant Clemes, of Port Hope. 
No. 3 Company — Captain Ward and Lieutenant Robertson, of Port Hope. 
No. 4 Company — Captain Hunter and Lieutenant Wallace, of Millbrook. 
No. 5 Company — Captain Walsh, of Springville. 
No. 6 Company — Captain Preston and Lieutenant Hanna, of Lifford. 
No. 7 Company — Major McDermid and Lieutenant Gray, M D, of Janetville. 

The camp is arranged on the top of the hill, the tents being set in rows among the pines. On the right hand, as you enter the gate is the guard tent, and on the left the Quarter-Master's stores and canteen. The Companies are arranged in order from these, the tents of the officers being at the head of each line, facing the west. The Commanding Officers tent is at the south-west corner of the officers' row, and a short distance further on the marquee, for the officer's mess. In front of the Battalion tents is a large and handsome marquee occupied by the Y M C A, and wherein books and periodicals are placed for anyone who desires to take advantage of this arrangement. The Commanding Officer has also had posted in a conspicuous place the regulations regarding the canteen, among which the sale of intoxicating liquors is strictly prohibited. The camp routine is as follows: Rouse at 5:30 o'clock, parade at 6 o'clock, and drill an hour before breakfast. After breakfast parade again for two hours, when the men are dismissed for dinner. The cooking arrangements are in regular camp style, and the soup is made by cooks detailed from each company. Each man is allotted per day one pound of beef, two pounds of bread, a piece of butter, a piece of cheese, tea, vegetables, pepper and salt. This is supplied the cooks in bulk, and after it is prepared, is served out to the men in the tents. The fare is good and the men relish it. Some of the soup made in this camp would do credit to the cuisine of many an able housewife. The meat and bread undergo a thorough and critical inspection before they are accepted and detailed to the men, and nothing but the very best is received. After dinner the men engage themselves as they like, reading, playing foot ball, or reclining in the shade, until the bugle sounds the warning to dress for parade. The afternoon parade begins at two o'clock, and is a long one, lasting until after five o'clock. 
By permission of the Head Master of Trinity College School, Reverend C J S Bethune, the spacious grounds of that institution have been placed at the disposal of the Commanding Officer during camp, for the purpose of drilling the men. These grounds are admirable for the purpose, being a level sward, and ample in size. They also afford spectators a magnificent view of the various maneuvers. After the afternoon parade is over, the work of the men for the day, except those who are detailed for guard duty, is done, and they are permitted to leave camp if they desire, a privilege many take advantage of after they have had their tea. They conduct themselves in a very orderly manner while promenading the streets of the town, but that is to be expected, for the people have never yet had occasion to regret the 46th being camped within the limits of the town, and this is the fourth time, for they always conduct themselves with propriety. The Band have three tents, immediately on the brow of the hill, at the south-east corner of the camp, where one of the most picturesque views, with the lake to the south, can be seen. We have often wondered that the beautiful view presented from this point of the Park Hill has never been transferred to canvas. The Band leads the men to the parade ground, and then retires to some convenient spot to practice, while the regiment is performing its drill. During the day also, and evening, they play on the brow of the hill for the men, and any visitors who may be in camp. They are kept pretty busy, but the boys like it. The camp is very neat and clean, and reflects much credit on the officers and men, who one and all seem to take a just pride in its general fine aspect. The men are all supplied with new uniforms, and the new regulation helmet, and they make a most soldier-like and handsome appearance. 
The Battalion will leave here on Monday afternoon next, about one o'clock for Toronto, to take part in the review to be held in that city on Tuesday next, in honor of His Excellency, the Marquis of Lome, Governor-General, and H R H Princess Louise, when we have no doubt they will acquit themselves in a creditable manner. They will return the day following, when camp will break up. On Saturday morning next the Battalion will take a march out, headed by the band, and will parade the principal streets of the town, affording the inhabitants, and the people of the country an opportunity of seeing for themselves the soldierly appearance they present. The Deputy Adjutant General will inspect the camp and Battalion on Monday morning next. The full strength of the Battalion in camp is 282 men.

SUNDAY SERVICE.
Battalion orders have been issued for Divine service, which will take place at the camp ground next Sunday, at 10:30 a.m. The service will be conducted by Reverend Mr Cooper, of Trinity College School, Chaplain of the Regiment. A choir has been selected from among the members of the Battalion to assist. We have no doubt many of our citizens will avail themselves of this opportunity of attending service in camp.




See: #1 Company, 46th Regiment 1905 photo

 

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